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Chapter One: Teaching and learning during COVID -19

Chapter One

Teaching and learning during COVID -19

Barbara Sawicka

Faculty of Agrobioengineering, University of Life Science in Lublin, Lublin, Poland

barbara.sawicka@up.lublin.pl

Krishnan Umachandran

General Manager, Org. Devt, Nelcast Ltd, India

umachandran_k@hotmail.com

Abstract

Remote learning, which until now was mainly the domain of the business world, also found its way to universities and schools due to COVID-19. Supporting e-learning through interactive virtual campuses has therefore become a necessity and not just a future goal of education. Models measuring the level of acceptance, learning efficiency and academic effectiveness, but also taking into account the level of skills and social competencies, are just emerging. In this aspect, we conducted research on large student groups to evaluate the remote learning process for which configuration, metadata, and statistical research are necessary in order to evaluate a learning management system. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: Integration of information and communication technologies, Education management, Learning management, e-learning; social competences, Teaching effectiveness, Academic effectiveness

Chapter Two: Fostering learner autonomy: Key to advancing learning in post COVID-19

Chapter Two

Fostering learner autonomy: Key to advancing learning in post COVID-19

Ng Siew Foen

Universiti Malaysia Kelantan, Malaysia

siewfoen@umk.edu.my

Gary John Confessore

George Washington University, US

gjcon@gwu.edu

Mohammad Affiq Kamarul Azlan

Universiti Malaysia Kelantan, Malaysia

affiq.ka@umk.edu.my

Abstract

The pandemic has made us rethink how teaching should be carried out to ensure effective learning takes place despite all the constraints faced.  To do this in ways that will be most supportive of the learner’s readiness to learn and the teacher’s capacity to understand and capitalize on that readiness, this paper proposes fostering learner autonomy as the key to advancing learning in post Covid-19. Theories related to the premises of learner autonomy were presented based on Fishbein and Ajzen’s work on the relationship between beliefs, attitudes, behavioral intentions, and behavior and Bandura’s self-efficacy. Three models which emphasize on understanding the learner’s learning readiness and teacher’s instructional constraint form the basis for addressing the issues faced. Last but not least, strategies for learner autonomy enhancement in the classroom were provided. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: Learner autonomy, Learning readiness, Behavioural intentions, Instructional constraints

Chapter Three: Impact of learning management systems in tourism and hospitality education in Bangladesh

Chapter Three

Impact of learning management systems in tourism and hospitality education in Bangladesh

Nazia Akthar

School of Business

Presidency University, Dhaka

Bangladesh

Azizul Hassan

Tourism Consultants Network

The Tourism Society, UK

azizulhassan00@gmail.com

Abstract

The software program that is aimed at management, reporting, recording, tracking and automation followed by the delivery of educational courses and other learning, training and development programmes is called Learning Management System (LMS). In concept, LMS emerged from eLearning directly. The application of this system is rather new in a developing country like Bangladesh. But the interest in it and the facilities for offering the system are gradually increasing. There is evidence that several universities and research centres are well equipped to deliver its flagship courses in Bangladesh with LMS. The country’s tourism and hospitality industry has been considerably expanding at least for the last few decades. This expansion resulted in the inclusion of tourism and hospitality education in major educational institutions in the country. Considering the better management of these educational courses, LMS can possibly be emphasised. This research outlines factors to apply LMS in tourism and hospitality education management in Bangladesh. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: Tourism, Hospitality, Education, Learning Management System, Bangladesh.

Chapter Four: Innovation in hospitality management education: Empirical evidences from university of Naples

Chapter Four

Innovation in hospitality management education: Empirical evidences from university of Naples

 Valentina Della Corte

valentina.dellacorte@unina.it

University of Naples, Federico II

Giovanna Del Gaudio

giovanna.delgaudio@unina.it

University of Naples, Federico II

Giuliana Nevola

giuliana.nevola@unina.it

University of Naples, Federico II

Simone Luongo

simone.luongo@unina.it

University of Naples, Federico II

Abstract

The tourism sector is characterized by high labour demand and education plays a key role. The competitive feature of the tourism sector requires highly skilled and specialized human resources. Higher education institutions have to guarantee new innovative teaching ways in collaboration with hospitality firms.  Professionalizing courses seem to be the right answer to an innovative teaching approach which is closer to the labour world. Innovative teaching does not only include the introduction of digital tools but also a different teaching approach based  on an inverted didactic through which academic professors, students and firms can interact and students are called to collaborate with universities and firms to co-create new knowledge and value. Tourism sector trends have greatly influenced the way in which education is conceived, prompting even particularly traditional contexts such as Italy to forge partnerships between the academic and business worlds in order to build new pathways that are linked to the specific needs of companies, demonstrating proactive attitudes in launching and seizing new challenges linked to digitalisation, the strong heterogeneity of demand and the increasing global competition. Professionalizing courses do not only contribute to reduce gaps between the academic word and labour word but they also have been supporting the hospitality sector during the pandemic, indeed students, professors and academic had the opportunity to meet in order to discuss about the tourism industry crisis due to the travel restrictions that have indirectly forced the closure of hospitality firms as hotels and restaurants. Digitalization, in this case, has played a key role to facilitate the communication between universities and firms, on-line webinars, on-line delphi panels have allowed discussions and to cooperate to face the economic crisis. This chapter offers a literature contribution focused on innovative teaching supported by empirical evidence in hospitality management education. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: Innovation, Education, University, Teaching, Hospitality

Chapter Five: Video-based courseware for LMS envisioned on student learning outcome and non-cognitive skills

Chapter Five

Video-based courseware for LMS envisioned on student learning outcome and non-cognitive skills

S. M. Suresh

Dept of Civil & Environmental Engg, NITTTR, Chennai

Mahalakshmi

NITTTR, Chennai

Abstract

The effectiveness and efficiency of an innovative learning environment like Moodle LMS can be further enhanced by implanting high quality Video modules and courseware which is complementary and supplementary. Video modules were designed and developed based on pedagogical principles to offer the course according to Video Production principles, offered as Short videos to ensure student listening and ease of uploading. A website was developed and a customized Moodle LMS was embedded in the site. The courseware comprising the formative evaluation activities was designed and developed based on the 9-steps of Gagne’s model. The video module was uploaded as video lessons in the website; various formative evaluation activities like Quiz, Assignment and Discussion forum were designed based on the Learning Outcome using revised Bloom’s Taxonomy. The gain of the non-cognitive skills namely Attention and Motivation, Confidence in Communication and Self learning capability is assessed by a methodically designed questionnaire for each skill. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: MOODLE, Short videos, Gagne’s Model, Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy, Learning outcome (LO), ARCS Model, QAMLM

Chapter Six: Students psychology towards the technological changes in the education sector

Chapter Six

Students psychology towards the technological changes in the education sector

Dinesh

Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bannari Amman Institute of technology, Sathyamangalam, TamilNadu, India-638401.

Alaa El Din Mahmoud

Environmental Sciences Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, 21511, Alexandria, Egypt

Green Technology Group, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, 21511, Alexandria, Egypt.

Samuthra

UG Student, Sri Krishna arts and science college, Coimbatore, TamilNadu, India-641008

Anandhamoorthy

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bannari Amman Institute of technology, Sathyamangalam, TamilNadu, India-638401

Sundar Raju

Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bannari Amman Institute of technology, Sathyamangalam, TamilNadu, India-638401.

Abstract

Over the past few centuries, the emergence of modern technologies has drastically changed our world. There are transformation and changes in the means of communication, customs, culture, and even the inter-personal relationships of human beings. Education is one of the most important institutional processes that have been highly influenced by the inception of technological advancements. Although it has positively impacted humans in a great deal, there are large amounts of unfortunate consequences that are to be least considered, and mental health is one of these subjects that is highly ignored by most. We focus here on how technological advancements in education systems affect the mental health of the students. The intent is to provide awareness about the neglected consequences of technology. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: Inter-personal relationship, Cognition, online learning, Technological advancements, Education sector, Psychological impacts.

Chapter Seven: The role of the university in industry networking through academic spin-offs

Chapter Seven

The role of the university in industry networking through academic spin-offs

Valentina Della Corte

Federico II University of Naples, Italy

valentina.dellacorte@unina.it

Giovanna Del Gaudio

Federico II University of Naples, Italy;

giovanna.delgaudio@unina.it

Giuliana Nevola

Federico II University of Naples, Italy

Krishnan Umachandran

Nelcast Ltd.,India

umachandran_k@hotmail.com

Alaa El Din Mahmoud

Environmental Sciences Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, 21511 Alexandria, Egypt.

Green Technology Group, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, 21511 Alexandria, Egypt.

alaa-mahmoud@alexu.edu.eg

 Abstract

Universities are trying to narrow the gap between science and industry and are urging to create specific units, designing specific programs to assist in breaking the raging of knowledge together with academics, businesses and venture capitalists, seeking to facilitate the transfer of knowledge from academia to the industry while infusing an entrepreneurial culture of innovation. The substantial increase in corporate venture capital spending reflected more fundamental shifts. Along with venture capital, banks, individual angel investors, and corporations are among the other providers of capital for these university- industry linkages. The spinoffs have a vital role in the knowledge and technology transfer process as contributors to the regional economic development and in the promotion of the innovation culture. As knowledge and technologies are transferred to the entrepreneurs, their enterprises can improve their operational processes, services or business models, adapting to compete with the evolving situations and demands of the market. Although participating in a knowledge and technology transfer provides benefits for university and industry, some barriers hinder this process. This article reviews the relationship between academic spin offs and the role of university to support entrepreneurs collocating it in the network of open innovation intermediaries and proposes a significant model that can be a spinoff support for quick, time bound, and immediate use to any industrial requirement. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: Technology, knowledge management, Open innovation, Industry agents, Networking, Research, Intermediaries, Deficiency resources.

Chapter Eight Impact of digitalization in organizational learning and knowledge management

Chapter Eight

Impact of digitalization in organizational learning and knowledge management

Kalirajan

Deputy Dean, L&T Institute of Project Management, Larsen and Toubro Limited, Chennai, India

kalirajan@lntipm.org

Santhosh Loganathan

Research Associate, L&T Institute of Project Management, Larsen and Toubro Limited, Chennai, India

santhosh.loganathan@lntipm.org

 Abstract

The importance of knowledge management in organizational learning and development is well established both in theory and practices. The existing knowledge management (KM) practices in organizations are becoming obsolete and it is necessary to cope with and adapt to new and digitally enabled KM practices. This study critically reviews and highlights the shortcomings of existing KM practices. Second, it brings out the possibilities of digitalization in organizational learning and knowledge management through diverse avenues. Further, it also highlights the implication of digitalization in organizational learning and knowledge management. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: Knowledge Management, Digitalization, Organizational learning, Organizational Knowledge.

Chapter Nine: Industry 4.0 technologies applied in teaching & learning

Chapter Nine

Industry 4.0 technologies applied in teaching & learning

Amuthalakshmi Periasamy

Madras School of Social Work, Egmore, India

amuthalakshmi@mssw.in

Krishnan Umachandran

General Manager, Org. Devt, Nelcast Ltd., India

umachandran_k@hotmail.com

Igor Jurcic

HT Eronet and Vice President of Association of EAT engineers in FB&H

ijurcic77@gmail.com

 Abstract

With COVID -19 pandemic, the whole world has put learning and teaching into online mode. This is only a tip of the iceberg. The infrastructural changes that are going to happen in the future, in the post COVID-19 scenario, is very phenomenal towards an emancipation of knowledge explosion, resulting in “know-what”, “know-how”, “know-why”, and “know-where” is going to become widely visible, available and accessible to everyone. Knowledge is no more a latent resource that could be held hostage by an author or by a facilitator or by a user for claiming benefits.  The recent online conduct of Teaching and Learning methodology through digital contents is going to gather mass by volume and will also get analysed for quality pruning. In addition, it would also get customised for various target group consumption. The ingredient of learning will change the quality of thinking, usage, and innovation  possibility across the world. Industry 4.0 technologies are depending on such explored knowledge repositories and would get astonishing breakthroughs by artificial intelligence (AI) applications. With less of travel and more of virtual connection the world is expected to bloom with inclusivity in people for using a knowledge-cloud that will loom to remove geographical limitations. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: Industry 4.0, Learning, Teaching, Online, Artificial intelligence, Machine learning, Knowledge management.

Chapter Ten: Exploring asynchronous and synchronous e-Learning of management-business’ students in the independent-campus program, Indonesia

Chapter Ten

Exploring asynchronous and synchronous e-Learning of management-business’ students in the independent-campus program, Indonesia

Hengky, S.H.

Bina Darma University, Indonesia

hengky_halim@binadarma.ac.id

hengky_halim@yahoo.com.au

Abstract

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic storm, it has implications for changing lectures carried out in a face-to-face manner into distance teaching. This distance lecture or e-learning uses various types of applications as a medium of communication. The application has advantages and disadvantages. This study explores the advantages and disadvantages of each application for supporting distance teaching. As well as, student opinion and comprehension or understanding in the lecture system. This study uses the mix mode method and purposive research. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: Communication media, E-learning, Applications, Learning systems.

Chapter Eleven: Learning content development using Generative Pretrained Transformer (Modelling a Decision Matrix)

Chapter Eleven

Learning content development using Generative Pretrained Transformer (Modelling a Decision Matrix)

Krishnan Umachandran

General Manager, Org. Devt, Nelcast Ltd., India

umachandran_k@hotmail.com

 Abstract

Text generation works on the generation of natural language text by computer programs with the task of reporting systems having how and to whom particular information could be relevant towards an objective for an identified set of people. When we generate multi-sentential text, we need a set of principles for organizing it, which are important contributions for modeling the discourse – obvious, inferable, mutual belief, and research. The content coverage towards relevant knowledge includes time, space, events and actions, cause, collectives, likelihood, obligation, possibility, negation, quantification, continuity and discreteness. It is quite easy to program the language, and the text can be made simple and elegantly written if desired. The text strings can be changed independently of any knowledge structures the program might use; there could be consistency between what the program does and what it conveys. The canned text can be anticipated in advance; for large systems, that may prove to be impossible. The text string can be limited to account the output to number words or count on sentences etc., so that a crisp structured output can be derived through the system. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: Text generator, GPT, Deep learning, Machine learning, Algorithm, Artificial intelligence, Natural language processing.

Chapter Twelve: Applying the Monitor Model Theory on online language teaching and learning

Chapter Twelve

Applying the Monitor Model Theory on online language teaching and learning

Mohammad Affiq Kamarul Azlan

Universiti Malaysia Kelantan, Malaysia

affiq.ka@umk.edu.my

Ng Siew Foen

Universiti Malaysia Kelantan, Malaysia

siewfoen@umk.edu.my

Abstract

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in many education institutions, from primary to tertiary education shifting from physical classroom to online teaching and learning. Higher learning institutions around the world have been exploring the best practices of conducting online teaching and learning to ensure the lesson contents are delivered as effectively as physical classrooms. This chapter explores how second language acquisition (SLA) can best be taught and learned online, by considering Krashen’s (1988) Monitor Model Theory. The Monitor Model Theory is famous as one of the underlying theories in second language learning, however, due to the shift towards online learning, its application in teaching and learning is best reassessed.  This chapter will explore the historical overview of the Monitor Model Theory, the critical aspects of the theory, review the current findings on the theory and discuss its application in online language teaching and learning, based on the authors’ personal observation as language instructors at University Malaysia Kelantan, a public university in Malaysia. It is found that the Monitor Model Theory contributes to effective teaching of second language through its hypotheses such as the Learning and Acquisition Hypothesis, the Input Hypothesis, the Monitor Hypothesis, the Natural Order Hypothesis and the Affective Filter Hypothesis. This chapter will be implicated in motivating language teachers to always tune their online language class to adhere to the principles of the Monitor Model Theory, to ensure effective language teaching and learning. Click here to get the full chapter.

Keywords: Second language acquisition, Monitor model theory, Online learning.